Surgical

Meet our Mohs Surgeon

Dr. Brett B. Miller is a board-certified Dermatologist and a fellowship-trained Mohs surgeon. A Pennsylvania native, Dr. Miller is a graduate of Penn State University and Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia. Following graduation, he completed his internship training at Crozer Chester Medical Center and his Dermatology residency at Drexel University College of Medicine, where he served as Chief Resident. Dr. Miller completed his fellowship training in Micrographic Surgery and Dermatologic Oncology under the expert guidance of Nathaniel Jellinek, MD at Dermatology Professionals, Inc. in Rhode Island. Dr. Miller is among only 1400 physicians in the country who are fellowship-trained in this field.

Dr. Miller’s fellowship training included Mohs micrographic surgery with an emphasis on surgical technique and reconstruction, the comprehensive management of skin cancers and extensive experience in the management of nail disease and nail surgery. He also specializes in laser surgery and cosmetic dermatology. Dr. Miller is a Diplomate of the American Board of Dermatology and a Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. He has authored numerous publications in prominent medical journals, and is a recipient of the Fellow-in-Training Clinicopathologic Case Competition Award.


surgical

WHAT IS MOHS SURGERY?

Used to treat skin cancer, this surgery has a unique benefit. During surgery, the surgeon can see where the cancer stops. This isn’t possible with other types of treatment for skin cancer.

The ability to see where the cancer stops gives Mohs (pronounced Moes) two important advantages:

  1. Mohs has a high cure rate.
  2. Mohs allows you to keep as much healthy skin as possible because the surgeon only removes the skin with cancer cells. This is especially important when skin cancer develops in an area with little tissue beneath (e.g., eyelid, ear, or hand)

 

What is it like to have Mohs surgery?

If you have Mohs surgery, you’ll see a doctor who is a trained Mohs surgeon. Most Mohs surgeons are dermatologists who have completed extensive training in Mohs surgery.

During Mohs surgery, most patients remain awake and alert. This means Mohs can safely be performed in a medical office or surgical suite. Only if extensive surgery is necessary would you be admitted to a hospital.

On the day of the surgery, your surgeon will first examine the area to be treated. You’ll then be prepped for surgery. This includes giving you an injection of anesthetic. This injection only numbs the area that will be operated on, so you’ll be awake during the surgery.

Once the anesthetic takes effect, the surgery can begin. The surgeon starts by first cutting out the visible skin cancer. Next, the surgeon removes a thin layer of surrounding skin. You’re then bandaged so that you can wait comfortably.

While you wait, the Mohs surgeon looks at the removed skin under a microscope. The surgeon is looking for cancer cells. If cancer cells are found, you’ll need another layer of skin removed.

This process of removing a thin layer of skin and looking at it under a microscope continues until the surgeon no longer sees cancer cells.

Once cancer cells are no longer seen, your surgeon will decide whether to treat your wound. Some wounds heal nicely without stitches. Others need stitches. To minimize the scar and help the area heal, some patients require a skin graft or other type of surgery.